Loading…

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, May 30
 

11:00am

12:30pm

Designing, Developing, & Testing Arts-Based Interventions
Given their capacity to communicate human experience, educate, provoke critical reflection, evoke empathy and facilitate intercultural dialogue, the arts are now being utilized as a primary strategy for advancing the goals of health and social services. In the field of prevention, interventions are designed to target risk factors leading to health and social problems. Arts organizations have an opportunity to utilize the arts to reduce health and social problems in communities because of what arts managers produce (the arts) and have access to (artists). However, evidence of effective arts-based methods, and formal training in intervention design and development has not been widely offered. In this pre-conference workshop, arts managers will learn how to design a program logic model, develop an assessment plan, and test an arts-based intervention in a community. Additionally, participants will collectively consider what a department of arts-based intervention might look like in an arts organization.


Thursday May 30, 2019 12:30pm - 2:30pm
Beefeaters North and South, Memorial Union

2:45pm

3:00pm

5:30pm

6:00pm

 
Friday, May 31
 

8:00am

8:00am

9:00am

10:45am

Theory, Practice, and the Practicality of Theory
Having risen out of the practice of arts management, our academic discipline is in the early stages of establishing a comprehensive body of theory, and thus, there is high demand for original scholarship in our field. This session will aim to provide guidance and examples that enable faculty to recognize connections between theory and the practice of arts management and to make the implicit more explicit.



Friday May 31, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

10:45am

The AI Era and Evolving Arts Management Accounting Practice and Instruction
Accounting is experiencing a seismic shift, as artificial intelligence-based software takes over repetitive tasks including transactional processing and audit testing. A quick internet scan will turn up hundreds of current articles admonishing accountants and bookkeepers to modernize their practices or be left behind. The collateral, of course, is the profound advantage to enterprises, including those in arts and culture, of embracing this revolution to re-strategize their deployment of scarce administrative resources


To what extent are Canadian arts organizations taking advantage of these innovations by adopting AI-based apps? How can college and university programs keep pace, preparing students to provide effective leadership in a rapidly evolving tech environment, and to instigate and manage transformative change in
workplace financial management practices?


Combining its specialized accounting practice with its depth of teaching expertise, the Young Associates team is uniquely positioned both to address these research questions and to develop and implement best practices.



Friday May 31, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

10:45am

Crisis of Compensation: A Critical Discussion of Fair Wages, Access, and Equity for Junior Professionals and Academics in Arts Administration
This roundtable and dialogue session will provide a space for arts administration educators to discuss how they can prepare their students and fellow junior faculty members to understand the job market and negotiate their compensation based on sound research and strategies.


Friday May 31, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

10:45am

Programming, Producing and Curation in Arts Management Education
This session will engage attendees in active discussion on arts events and exhibition planning, producing, and evaluation as relevant to a robust arts management curriculum along with student, program, and community benefits. Presenters will ask attendees to share their knowledge and experiences regarding how this topic is manifest in their respective programs, and, if applicable, in their work with local cultural communities. The discussion will also explore how this topic is represented in the Graduate and Undergraduate AAAE Standards for Arts Administration Program Curricula.


Friday May 31, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday May 31, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Alumni Lounge

1:15pm

Audience Building and Financial Health in the Nonprofit Performing Arts: The State of the Literature
Hear from Francie Ostrower, the principal investigator of the Building Audiences for Sustainability Initiative: Research and Evaluation, a multi-year study of audience-building activities by nonprofit performing arts organizations commissioned and funded by The Wallace Foundation through a $4.3 million grant. Professor Ostrower will be presenting on the project’s recently released review of the literature on audience building and financial health in the nonprofit performing arts, and facilitating a discussion with attendees about the state of the literature in relation to arts management curriculum and training.

Speakers
FO

Francie Ostrower, Professor, University of Texas at Austin

Professor, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs and College of Fine Arts and Director, Portfolio Program in Arts and Cultural Management and Entrepreneurship University of Texas at Austin


Friday May 31, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

1:15pm

Lessons from the Global South: Transforming Arts Management Curriculum Through Inclusion and Collaboration
The Brussel’s Manifesto on Arts Management united networks in North America, Europe, and Asia to help globalize arts management curriculum in an increasingly interconnected world. This session focuses on the importance of including the Global South in our international studies, and the expansion of professional networks. The facilitator will present practices and outcomes from global arts management studies in Latin America and Africa as a springboard for group discussion. Centering the Global South is seen as critical to imagining a global arts management curriculum capable of critiquing colonial legacies, disrupting white supremacy, and fortifying our efforts to achieve equity and inclusion in the arts.

Speakers
AS

Amy Shimshon-Santo, Head of Arts Management, Associate Professor

Head of Arts Management, Associate Professor, Sotheby’s Institute of Art at Claremont Graduate University


Friday May 31, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

1:15pm

Views from the Outside: Are There Too Many Arts Management Students for the Job Market?
Keith D. Lee, a nonprofit and arts management consultant, will moderate a 90-minute panel discussion to address external views associated with arts administration education as these relate to career development and the job market. Panelists will present contrasting views of arts and nonprofit administration education as these relate to the needs of the arts professionals in the field. For approximately fifty minutes, panelists will discuss their own experiences in arts and/or nonprofit management. Following this dialogue, the panel and session attendees will exchange questions and explore new strategies with insight for campus faculty and arts administrators and also for practitioners about career enhancement and development options.

Speakers
JR

Jacquelyn Rucker, MSEd Associate Director of Community Relations

MSEd Associate Director of Community Relations, University of Notre Dame Notre Dame Center for Arts & Culture


Friday May 31, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

1:15pm

Teaching Artistic Programming and Curatorial Decision-Making Process with Constrained Optimization and Voter Preference Models
How arts organizations and their leaders select specific works or artists is the subject of many case studies, but there is less guidance on the systematic processes of decision-making across diverse art forms in diverse organizational settings. This presentation will help equip arts administration educators with tools conveying curatorial decision-making as a constrained optimization process in a collaborative decision process.

Speakers
RJ

Roland J. Kushner, Associate Professor of Business & Business Program Director

Associate Professor of Business & Business Program Director, Muhlenberg College


Friday May 31, 2019 1:15pm - 2:30pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

2:45pm

Assessing your work today to set a path for thriving tomorrow
Artists Thrive is a growing initiative offering activities, practices, language, visions and values of what it means to succeed and thrive as an artist – and what it means to have a thriving arts sector and, eventually, thriving communities.  Artists Thrive is like a navigational system that helps us see where we are in our work, where we want to go, what is important to measure, and how we can improve in ways that benefit everyone involved.

The tools are meant to be customized, adapted, and applied to many situations to support your work and can be used again and again as a reference point for measuring how you, your department, or community collaboration is advancing toward your goals over time. This session will overview the website and provide activities and tools to take back to your campus to start your own local conversations around supporting artists.
https://artiststhrive.org/

Speakers
avatar for Heather Pontonio

Heather Pontonio

Senior Program Director & Artists Thrive Activator, Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation, Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation


Friday May 31, 2019 2:45pm - 4:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

2:45pm

Examining the Arts Management Education Pipeline: A Content Analysis of Position Descriptions
This study assesses the current skill sets, credentials, and responsibilities required of arts management educators. Through discourse analysis of position descriptions for full-time arts management faculty, collected over two academic years (2017-18 and 2018-19), this study analyzes job titles, required and preferred qualifications and skills, and the tasks and responsibilities presented. The results of the study provide insight on current and future curriculum design of graduate arts management programs, ways to strengthen and diversify the workforce pipeline, and considerations for programs looking to hire in the near future.


Friday May 31, 2019 2:45pm - 4:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

2:45pm

"...By Any Other Name..."
As a field, we use combinations of terms to describe  programs to potential students and to distinguish them from similar offerings. There is usually a modifier: arts, cultural or some discipline-specific term. Then there’s a noun that points to career  expectations: management… administration… entrepreneurship… enterprise… leadership… A recent survey explored the extent to which differences in what we call our programs reflect distinctions in the curricula we offer our students. The panel will help us think about the meaning of these words and, by extension, what exactly we are preparing our students to do. Then the survey results will inform a general discussion in which all are welcome to participate.



Friday May 31, 2019 2:45pm - 4:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

2:45pm

The Revolution is Inclusion: Trends in Arts, Education, Accessibility, and Disability
One in five Americans has a disability. There is a strong probability you know someone with a disability and have learners with disabilities in your classes and programs. How can our attitudes, practices, and administration reduce real (and perceived) barriers to participation? Given the spectrum of disability, how can we implement more universal design strategies to ensure people can access, understand, and make (personal) meaning from the information we are conveying and experiences we are creating? This session encourages you to change the way you think about and engage people with disabilities while giving you tools to advance a revolution for disability inclusion.



Friday May 31, 2019 2:45pm - 4:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

4:00pm

Snack Break
Friday May 31, 2019 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Pyle Center, Room 313

4:30pm

Arts Leaders addressing Racial Bias: A Case Study of Enrich Chicago
This paper presents a case study of Enrich Chicago, a cohort  of over twenty prominent arts and philanthropic organizations in Chicago, IL, committed to anti-racist organizing within the arts, focused on addressing systematic racism and its effects on public culture.


Friday May 31, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

4:30pm

Transforming Urban Neighborhoods Into Intercultural Communities Through Community Engagement and Immersive Storytelling
How can arts leaders, managers, and educators leverage the transformative power of the arts and culture to unite, enlighten, and engage our diverse communities and audiences; entice economic and cultural development; and increase our individual and collective empathy for one another? Immersing audiences in the stories of often overlooked communities — informed by the community’s identity and needs — is a constructive approach investigated during this session.


Friday May 31, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

4:30pm

Leading Change: Two Executive Leadership Transitions through the Lens of Cognitive Restructuring
This paper will first explore the concept of Cognitive Restructuring and the change process, and then use it to analyze the first year of employment of the new Executive Producer of the Utah Shakespeare Festival and the new Director/Curator of the Southern Utah Museum of Art. This unique opportunity presented itself when these two 501(c)(3) arts organizations in the small town of Cedar City, Utah, hired individuals from outside of the community to helm those organizations through a period of great reinvention and transition.


Friday May 31, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

4:30pm

Accessibility in the Arts for Arts Administrators
This session will explore accessibility services at cultural art centers/organizations for people with diverse disabilities. The session will present legal, policy, and programmatic frameworks that arts administrators can use to develop accessible services. It is critical for arts administrators to be involved in the implementation of these access services to ensure accessibility for all their stakeholders and fulfill their DEI standards. Based on different case studies and practices from institutions such as the Kennedy Center, this presentation will describe outcomes that are contributing to best practices in this field.



Friday May 31, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

4:30pm

Advancing Pedagogy with Open Source Technology: An Interactive Workshop Demonstrating the Use of Google and Other Open Source Systems to Create and Apply Community-Sourced Data and Mapping Tools
Today’s arts leaders must look at our world from multiple perspectives and scales. To transform our students into successful arts managers, arts administration educators can provide them with contemporary tools to manage their practice. Understanding the geography of cultural communities and how they relate to demographic, civic and urban development data is an essential tool for our students to engage with the larger issues facing arts administrators today. At the core, through  presentation, discussion and interactive workshop, we desire to empower educators, students and arts leaders to utilize these tools to further their organizational missions; and to deepen their practice in understanding the current landscape of our field.


Friday May 31, 2019 4:30pm - 5:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

6:30pm

 
Saturday, June 1
 

8:00am

Registration & Breakfast
Bring your breakfast to the membership meeting!

Saturday June 1, 2019 8:00am - 8:30am
Pyle Center, Room 313

8:30am

10:45am

Walking the Talk: One Program’s Journey Towards Equity and Inclusion
Over a period of five years, our program developed a significant effort towards promoting equity and inclusion in arts management education writ small (within the program) and arts management practice writ large (in the field). Our measures included significant changes to admissions and internship requirements, faculty hiring, classroom practice, curriculum design, fellowship development, faculty training, and support structures in the classroom, campus and employment. The work required re-education of campus administrators and prospective employers, confrontation of our own biases and weaknesses, and a reformulation of the relationship with our students. In this paper I describe our efforts, what we learned, what we are wrestling with, what we got right, and what we got wrong. The paper includes recommendations for other programs interested in taking an equitable and inclusive approach to arts management education and practice.



Saturday June 1, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

10:45am

Online Arts Administration Course Design for Active Student Engagement
This panel will engage in a dialogue about the delivery of arts administration courses in an online environment and through the lens of instructional design. It will start with the role of Instructional Designers and the assistance they can bring from across disciplines and various programs will be used as examples. The discussion will also be coupled with the tips, tricks, and strategies for building a course that delivers a quality education, engages students, provides balance to the faculty workload, and contributes to an active learning environment.



Saturday June 1, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

10:45am

Internship Programming and its Effect on Diversity in Arts Management
Wolf Trap hosts approximately 45 interns annually and has played a key role in shaping the professional success of students for many years. As an organization that values their commitment to diversity and the power of the arts to change society, Wolf Trap feels it is essential to provide its interns with intentional diversity and inclusion programming that will in turn bring awareness to the importance of diversity within the arts management field. Join Wolf Trap for a session to hear firsthand from Wolf Trap intern alumni about how their internships and experiences during and after college played a valuable role in helping them successfully transition into the workforce as diverse young professionals.


Saturday June 1, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

10:45am

Connecting Artistic Practice, Foundational Skills in Arts Management, and Innovation & Entrepreneurship in the Arts - A New Model.
What does the model for training a 21st century artist look like? This question is at the core of a summer research project to develop a series of case studies based on the arts management & entrepreneurial activity of Miami Alumni. These case studies will test the efficacy of the model that the new program and curriculum are built on.


Saturday June 1, 2019 10:45am - 12:00pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

12:00pm

Lunch
Saturday June 1, 2019 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Alumni Lounge

1:00pm

Internships in Arts Management and Administration
The reality is that students with one or more internships have a better chance of gaining employment in the creative sector. However, given the relevance of internships in arts administration education, our field does not have standards that constitute (1) what constitutes an arts administration internship is, (2) in what settings they take place, (3) who supervises interns, (4) how distinguishable undergraduate and graduate internships are, (5) at what point in a student’s program of study does the internship take place and what pre- and requisite skills should they have, and (6) what are best practices for internship supervision and assessment.



Saturday June 1, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

1:00pm

Women in Entertainment: Outsider Influence, Career Strategies, and the Power of Narrative
No examination of Nashville’s music identity is complete without discussion of the significance of Music Row (“the Row”), a presence largely responsible for shaping that identity. Located in a midtown Nashville neighborhood, the Row is a music business center comprised of a number of recording studios, major record and publishing companies, performance rights organizations (SESAC, BMI, ASCAP) and offices of the American Federation of Musicians -- all physically located within the same vicinity. The role of women on the Row is an important part of the story of the Nashville music industry. “Therefore, this paper explores that story for two groups of women: (a) women in music business (non-artistic) roles and (b) women of color on and off the Row. Specifically, the paper examines the impact of outsider influence, career strategies, and narrative on those populations.


Saturday June 1, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

1:00pm

ENCATC/AAAE Internationational Panel
Internationalism in higher education is almost taken for granted across the sector today though Arts Administration was one of those disciplines that attracted international attention since the early stages of its development.  The field expanded over the years at institutional and curriculum level worldwide and is now a global market in its own right – in terms of demand and of provision, with degrees offered in many countries worldwide. This AAAE-ENCATC session brings together a panel of US and international fellow academics to discuss to what extent and in what ways Arts Administration as a field of study has been affected by internationalism and (more recently) globalisation.  The curriculum, learning and teaching, interdisciplinarity, employability are just some ‘usual suspect’ themes that are likely to come up in the PechaKucha style presentations and conversation with the audience so we can all share ideas and learn from each other’s experience/s.  Do join us to debate internationalism and globalisation in Arts Administration education and their impact on the ‘direction of travel‘ of the field.’

Speakers
DA

Dr. Ana Gaio, Centre for Culture and the Creative Industries, Department of Sociology, City, University of London

Centre for Culture and the Creative Industries, Department of Sociology, City, University of London, ENCATC board member
RG

Richard G Maloney, PhD, Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Performing Arts Administration graduate program

Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Performing Arts Administration graduate program, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and Affiliated Faculty, Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service, New York University, ENCATC board member
SH

Sherri Helwig, President, CAAAE, Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, University of Toronto Scarborough

President, CAAAE (Canadian Association of Arts Administration Educators), Associate Professor, Teaching Stream, University of Toronto Scarborough, Lecturer, Queen’s University



Saturday June 1, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

1:00pm

The Impacts of Investing in Creativity: Longitudinal Outcomes of Artist Professional Development for Individual Artists and Their Community
The Culture Wars of the mid 1990s ultimately resulted in significant funding reductions for American artists.  The ensuing crisis for artists inspired the Ford Foundation to commission the Urban Institute to study the environment of support mechanisms for artists. Culminating three years of research, the Institute published its report Investing in Creativity in 2003. Building on this research a coalition of arts and culture funders launched Leveraging Investments in Creativity (LINC), a ten-year philanthropic experiment to create change in the American support system for artists. In 2008, as a part of a partnership funded through the LINC initiative, Artist INC was intentionally designed to address the Investing in Creativity report for artists residing in Kansas City.  From its inception, Artist INC was research-based and data driven. The survey instruments utilized acquired a significant amount of information on artist tools and skills, financial and legal practices, and attitudes. The resulting database includes one of the most detailed longitudinal data sets of practicing artist conditions post-professional development intervention in the United States. Utilizing this database, this session will explore the transitions of individual artists and their community across a five-year trajectory and propose directions for future pedagogical development based on the analysis.


Saturday June 1, 2019 1:00pm - 2:15pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

2:30pm

Designing, Developing, & Testing Arts-Based Interventions
Many professional arts organizations are now more aware of their shortcomings in the areas of equity, diversity and inclusion in their staffs and leadership, but are just starting to take meaningful action. Arts Administration programs can increase the positive impact they have on increasing the diversity of staff and leadership of arts organizations with purposeful approaches to preparing their students to enter the field after graduation.  Hannah will share practices from the undergraduate program at University of North Carolina at Greensboro, a Minority Serving Institution, and participants will work together to share tactics and find areas of improvement in their job search support and career readiness efforts. 



Saturday June 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 335

2:30pm

Arts Managers on the Front Line: Addressing Emergency Preparedness in Arts Administration Curriculum
An argument is made that emergency management education specific to arts administrators—with a focus on the benefits and methods of preparedness—is a key step in addressing the issue of motivation and prioritization in emergency planning in the field. Two key learning objectives should be integrated into arts administration curriculum: the ability to create cross-sector community networks for increased resiliency and the ability to identify, and prepare for, modern threats relevant to places of culture. The paper also calls for the academic discipline to leverage practical field-level experiences with research opportunities to further explore what systems, and sub-systems, influence arts organizations’ vulnerabilities to emergency events.


Saturday June 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

2:30pm

Preventing Disaster with Planning and Action!
Disaster planning prepares us for what is coming and protecting what we can. The recent UN climate report makes it clear that we are going to experience significant disruption, and warns that we have a small window in which to act to mitigate the very worst of what is possible, and can still save the planet and all living creatures. With this daunting news, this workshop addresses how to do more than watch and worry, and asks and answers the question of “How do we do our part and how do we inspire our students, administrations, and schools to do the same?


Saturday June 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 332

2:30pm

Teaching Arts Administration with The Case Method
Long ago are the days of lecturing or teaching to the text, giving a test, and leaving for a break. Today, engaged students want to apply their readings and lectures in a pragmatic manner and they want to connect the theory with practice. The case method of teaching is not new but is used less in some universities or programs. This panel will engage in a conversation about their use of the case method using published case studies, their approach to teaching with case studies, and conclude with the process of writing new case studies.



Saturday June 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 309

2:30pm

Stackable Certificates: Path to an Innovative Masters’ Degree in Arts Administration or Curricular Chaos?
This session explores the challenges and lessons learned when creating a new masters’ degree program in Arts Administration. With the aim of reimagining the educational experience of graduate students, the College of Fine Arts at Ohio University advanced an innovative, college-wide structure for the new graduate program: students complete the Foundational Certificate in Arts Administration, choose a Stackable Certificate that specifically aligns with their arts career interests (including the disciplines of Dance, Music, Theater, Art & Design, Museum Studies, and Film), and complete a required professional internship to earn a Master of Arts Administration. This session will delve into considerations of resources, curriculum, interdisciplinary partnerships, innovation and entrepreneurship, and potential contributions to the future of arts administration education.


Saturday June 1, 2019 2:30pm - 3:45pm
Pyle Center, Room 325/326

3:45pm

Ice Cream Social
The Babcock Hall Dairy Plant and Store have a long and rich history on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus since 1951. It’s named after Stephen Moulton Babcock, a UW researcher in the department of Agricultural Chemistry, and inventor of the first reliable butterfat content milk test (1890). He also worked alongside UW bacteriologist Harry L. Russell in developing the cold-curing process for ripening cheese (1897).

Saturday June 1, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Play Circle Theatre Lobby, Memorial Union

4:15pm

6:30pm

Cocktail Reception
Saturday June 1, 2019 6:30pm - 7:00pm
Pyle Center

7:00pm

8:30pm

Lakeside Performance by Resonance Madison
A site specific performance celebrating artists and this place we call Madison.  

Conference attendees are welcomed to follow the performance on foot to the adjacent lakeshore, or watch the performance live-streamed by WPT in the Pyle Center.


Saturday June 1, 2019 8:30pm - 9:00pm
Pyle Center